Industries & Festivals — January 19, 2013 at 11:15 am

Russia’s box office reaches record high in 2012

Russia_flagRussia’s total box office reached a record high $1.33 billion in 2012, which is an increase by 18.8 percent from the previous year, according to HR.

According to Movie Research company in Russia, the total box office revenues in the country were growing steadily since 2010.

The trade publication Kinobiznes Segodnya (Film Business Today), which released the figures, also said that the proportion of local fare in the total box office was 15.1 percent, with 74 Russian releases grossing $187.4 million.

The average ticket price reached 226 rubles ($7.24), up 2.1 percent in dollar terms and 2.7 percent in rubles from 2011.

A total of 146 films grossed more than $1 million, and 39 took in more than $10 million.

Just like the year before, Walt Disney Studios Sony Pictures Releasing CIS was the most successful distributor, with a gross of $312.1 million achieved by its 28 releases. The company’s top-grossing movie was “The Avengers” with $43.68 million.

WDSSPR was followed by Karo ($184.4 million), whose highest-grossing release was “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” ($26.58 million in the first 11 days), and “Central Partnership” ($172 million; its top release was Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted at $49.4 million).

The box-office champion among local films was “Dukhless” (Soulless), distributed by UPI, which grossed $13.4 million.

Back in October 2012, “Central Partnership”, biggest Russian film rental company from now on will also produce their own movies. The company planned to start their own production back in 2008, however it did not work due to financial crisis.

The Movie Research Company’s report for the 2011 film industry in Russia says 19 percent of all shown films were domestically made.

The box office takings that year were $1.2 billion. According to the report, Russia’s world share was 3.6 percent in 2011.



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